“Bach, in his Ciaccona for solo violin, transforms the dance into an extended soliloquy of tragic character. It sounds entirely unsuitable for a wild wedding, yet the triple rhythm of the original dance is implicit throughout, as is the pattern of a repeating chord progression.”

Susan Boyle does not fit the magazine standard, which of course is basically impossible for any woman, anyhow. Frankly, though, she doesn’t seem too interested in trying to do that. She just walked herself out there on internationally syndicated TV and slayed the competition on Britain’s Got Talent, and it was beautiful. She made a shallow and heartless industry take notice of her talent and judge her not on age or appearance but on the voice she possessed. Since then, she’s been praised by people in all walks of life, and one blogger even reported crying when she saw the video of Boyle singing. Thank you, Susan, you’ve sparked hope in a lot of people that this shallow world can have a heart and can change.

All of Soundfly’s mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional support and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! That means you’re not just getting the course content, but a coach who’s invested in your success. With courses like The Art of Hip-Hop Production, Beat Making in Ableton Live, and Modern Pop Vocal Production, there’s nothing you won’t be able to improve on after a session with us! 

Top 10 rappers of all time forbes

Exclusively on our Instagram account, we’ll be sharing videos and stories instructing some fun and modern aspects of home production. (By the way, we issue fun production and composition challenges every month, and follow them down the rabbit hole ourselves with you. Follow us to see what happens and join in!)

“Better Now”: So, how the heck does Post Malone do his vibrato thing, anyway? Another thing he does that’s uniquely him is that he really likes to sing different melodies in all the verse areas. It’s just not standard practice how often he does it. You’re making my form labels fall apart, Post, knock it off! Wait, your name is a form label… ouch, my brain!

Your narrative probably won’t come together in one sitting. So as a first step, get out a piece of paper and do some brainstorming on the following questions. A good narrative, like any great story, has a beginning, middle, and end. To get ideas, think about where you started and where you want to end up.

In a perfect world, your numbers year to year should be pretty consistent, which will put them at ease. Unfortunately, that’s rarely the case with 1099 contractors (especially artists, songwriters, etc.). There’s great years, good years, and bad years. That’s just the way it is.

This idea has changed my life as a part-time musician (I’m not exaggerating): Do one thing today that will move your career forward, even the least little bit. Don’t think of all the things you want to be doing — all the things that could boost your career. Just think of one of those things. Then do it.

Vh1 save the music commercial

Take a big task — like building a music website — and break it into steps. What part of that process can you do right now with the time you have? Then tomorrow, you can do another step in that process. If you only have 15 minutes to do something, get something done in that 15 minutes. Then you can go to bed knowing you pushed your music career a little further forward.

In general, women should have about eight full glasses of water per day, and men should drink about ten. Though we like to use that as a basic rule of thumb, this doesn’t take into account the other factors that contribute to dehydration. Some of those things include temperature, air dryness, and the other things you’ve put into your body throughout the day like dehydrating beverages, foods, and medicines. Speaking of medicines…

Mentor: Ryan Lindberg

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

Without the internet around to provide an unbroken timeline of artistic events to a potentially endless landscape of wandering eyes, records that couldn’t achieve access to a viable fanbase in the 1980s have mostly, inevitably found themselves buried in the sands of time forever. Many creative masterworks, no matter how well-appreciated at the time of their initial pressing — if mismanaged by independent, boutique labels that couldn’t stay afloat financially — have either approached or gone completely off the cliff edge of existence. But thanks to the interplay between user-submitted content on the web and the way platforms help listeners discover it, some records do actually manage to climb back out of the sand.