Music theory is a useful feather in the cap of any music producer. Learning a bit of theory will help you fundamentally understand the music you record, the emotional power that can be achieved by it, and how to mix and arrange everything so it comes out more clearly. Check out Soundfly’s popular free course, Theory for Bedroom Producers, to get a sense of how learning just a bit of music theory can do wonders for your songwriting and production practice.

If you sit down with pen and paper in hand and find that no new ideas are coming your way, consider a fresh perspective in your writing process. If you are used to writing your songs by starting with just an acoustic guitar and vocals, try opening your mind by starting on the piano instead. If you usually start with a melody in mind but just can’t seem to find the right tune today, start by looping a beat or groove instead. With the great variety of affordable recording and composing software on the market today, you can have a wide palette of sounds at your fingertips and no longer be limited to just the instruments that you own or have the ability to record at one time. If the idea of recording software makes you anxious, you can get started with something as simple as Apple’s Garageband if you are a Mac user or FL Studio on PC.

What I like to do personally is start my morning off by blazing through the most important tasks of my day while my energy and focus are at their peak. This may include sending time-sensitive files to a client, responding to emails, and bouncing stems for a performance. Pushing through my important tasks early gives me time to complete more creative tasks during the rest of the day, such as practicing my instrument, working on new material, and writing with collaborators.

Grants for artists of color 2019

This course covers quite a bit of ground. It starts with some Ableton basics, and then moves through important concepts like velocity, variation, and sound design, closing out with an intro to advanced techniques. Robin was a remarkable student who came into the course pretty new to Ableton and ended up creating this awesome, professional-sounding track. There are so many cool elements at play here. It’s a really nice blend of variety and cohesion from start to finish. Check it out, but be warned that you may end up leaving it on repeat.

This post is part of Flypaper’s Home Recording Week, where we’re sharing tips and insights from our community on home recording and production workflow. Read our featured articles here, or sign up for our weekly newsletter to make sure you never miss a beat!

You might have promising music and loads of enthusiasm, but none of that matters much when you’re on stage for the first time and don’t know what to expect. Building performance experience can also give you more confidence and credibility throughout the booking process, and you’ll thank yourself later.

And so now we come to the theory that Bach’s chaconne is about the death of his wife, as explained in the tin-foil-hatted liner notes to Morimur. Loopy though the theory is, it’s popular for a reason. Music is abstract, and it helps to have a narrative to hang onto when we listen. Even professional musicians like the hidden message idea. Markham quotes his students:

Take the next steps in your music career with Soundfly’s curated Hustle series of articles and popular online course offerings on topics like how to book a tour on a shoestring, how to get all the royalties you never knew existed, and how to let your fans fund your next music project! Use code FLYPAPERSENTME for $100 off any course on the site that isn’t free! 

Best rappers in the game

This spectacular Christmas cover collection is sure to win over any chiptune-hating Scrooge any time of the year. Bit Shifter’s “Let It Snow” is one of my favorite arrangements of anything ever.

Try writing in a journal or on your computer as a continuous stream-of-consciousness for an hour. Don’t bother “evaluating” what you write, and don’t make any edits or changes — just focus on writing as fast as possible. It can help to write in a “free verse” style with lots of line breaks. While this can help you generate lines and lyrics, most often this can help you come up with “big ideas” or things you think are worth spending more time on. Which brings me to my next point…

“Finesse” (Remix): Cardi B drops herself into this remix in a relatively extended intro. There’s also a pre-chorus, as well as a fake-out bridge which I’m going to call a “pre-bridge” (P2). My favorite part of this section, this song, and maybe this entire study in general, is that just when you think the whole thing is going to be done over the three-chord loop of♭VI  V  i, they throw in a ♭vii to ♭III turnaround, or, for the functionally minded, a “ii  V  I” that resolves back to D♭. This tonal trick, as well as the extensions and voicings, are really typical of the era they’re harkening back to in the video. Super clever.

Most closets are in the bedroom which is great. The room has soft furnishings already in it (e.g.: beds, curtains, rugs, clothes). Standing in front of the open closet is optimal or if you have a walk-in, even better. Make a part in the clothes on hangers and place your mic (whether its on a shelf or a mic stand) in between the parted clothes without letting the clothes touch the microphone. Additional blankets behind, to the sides, and above you are ideal. The goal is to absorb as many reflections from the room as possible.

Now is a great time to mention that Soundfly is currently hard at work developing our own Mainstage course in scoring to picture, due to launch later this year. If you’re interested in being notified when the course launches, just sign up for our mailing list and you’ll be the first to know. In the mean time, we have loads of other online courses that might suit your interests, as well as a team of Soundfly Mentors experienced in composition and arranging!