This would also be a good place to bring up that some music theory people don’t consider two-note intervals “chords.” But my take on that whole controversy is that, when naming things, it should be taken into account how our brains ascertain tonal information based on everything we’ve heard before, in all of music. It’s just something our brains do, so why deny it because we selfishly want a more tidy nomenclature?

The problem is that these tendencies are the exact opposite of what we should be doing if we want to see real improvement, according to Dr. Anders Ericsson. And we might be wise to listen. Dr. Ericsson is widely considered one of the foremost thinkers on the subject of “expertise.” His research is one of the primary sources that inspired Malcolm Gladwell’s now-famous “10,000 Hour Rule” — that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to be an expert in anything. But that rule, though memorable, is far from the whole story.

The same goes for children of the ’80s, ’70s, ’60s, and so on. If you’re writing in a context targeted for baby boomers, why not borrow the triplets and I-vi-IV-V chord progression from the 1954 doo-wop song “Earth Angel”?

Music unites

That’s really what touring with your band is all about; the opportunity to get out there and do what you love in front of the people that love seeing it. It helps to know that when you arrive in a new city, there will already be a live music crowd ready to greet you with open arms. And some of the most vibrant, bustling music scenes — with great venues, great young bands, and audiences constantly looking for a good time out — exist in places with a few universities nearby.

With over 70 million monthly listeners worldwide now, podcasting is more popular than it’s ever been. According to a recent study, there are currently over 700,000 active podcasts. While that’s great news for podcast fans, that many choices makes it difficult for new podcasts to find their audience.

Student-Artist: Storm Erlingson

As expected, this album has almost everybody up in arms, siding one way or the other. There is no label. There are no distributors and no digital copies. To the Wu-Tang Clan, it’s not even an album but a singular work of art on par with an original Van Gogh or one of Shakespeare’s manuscripts. And at the price it will eventually be purchased for, who’s to argue with that?

The classical music world evolved over time away from Bach’s cool objectivity and toward the fiery emotionalism of the Beethoven era. In 1853, Johannes Brahms wrote a letter to Clara Schumann about the chaconne, and his description was a wee bit over the top:

Quick grant applications

John Entwistle almost didn’t make this list, by virtue of being, well, too good. There are so many great Who songs to choose from, but one melody that tends to stick in my head is the pentatonic major run heard behind the “I tip my hat” refrain in this song. The riff starts at the relative minor and runs down to the root, hitting all five notes of the scale. It’s a simple sequence, but I’ve noticed that scalar walk-downs to the root pretty much always sound good on the bass. (For example, check out the choruses of the Beatles’ “Helter Skelter” and Kiss’ “Shout It Out Loud”). Entwistle repeats this motif several times throughout the chorus with slight variations that keep it continually compelling.

With all of Logic’s inredible instruments, producers often rely on the sound of the samples right out of the box, here’s how to make them more interesting.

Even if you’re not a huge fan of Ali Farka Touré or other West African musicians, you’ve still probably seen one at a friend’s house or in an attic somewhere — or heard them on a Ben Harper song. Or maybe you even have one yourself that your weird aunt got you for Hannukah one year. Well, hopefully we can help you dust it off and give it a new life.

The integration of music into fundamental community practices (as opposed to sectioning music out as a separate subject area) may contribute to how many African musical traditions have gone largely unstudied by foreigners. In other words, music is daily life in many parts of Africa. But as a result, many African music educators do not permit or encourage written documentation of their work, as it is understood to dilute the lived experience. This in itself contributed to Afrocentric music continuing to be undervalued in the canon (largely upheld by traditions in the West), despite prominence across mass populations worldwide.

Jeremy is a Montreal-based musician, sound artist and improviser who loves giving advice to emerging artists on how to make their tours more effective. He writes, records and performs electroacoustic “concrète” music for tape, oscillators and amplified objects and surfaces, as well as solo guitar. He has performed and released material throughout Europe and the UK, Asia, the US and Canada, mostly with his trio Sontag Shogun.