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The presence of the G# in the Harmonic Minor scale changes the names of the modes, because they now contain a different tone. For example, D Dorian has now become D Dorian (Augmented fourth): This mode differs from D Dorian by one note, the G#, which is an augmented fourth away from the Tonic, hence its name D Dorian (Augmented fourth). In the same scale, the mode constructed on E has now become E Phrygian (Major third). Since a Phrygian mode is by definition a minor mode, some people prefer to call it Mixolydian (Minor second, Minor sixth).

Alex is a multi-instrumentalist, composer and producer from Sydney, Australia. He founded the post-rock band sleepmakeswaves, with which he has toured Asia, America, Europe and Australia. In his spare time he writes music for short films, produces bands and subsists on altogether too much coffee. Alex is the instructor of the free Soundfly course, Live Clicks and Backing Tracks.

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In a nutshell, mastering incorporates all of the audio work done on the master output from a mixed song or album. While originally intended as the mechanical preparation step for putting music into its final media format for playback, mastering later began to include additional post-mixing audio enhancement work in order to optimize the sound specifically for the various intended playback formats (ex: vinyl, CD, digital, etc.).

As we can see, we can divide modes in Major and Minor modes and this will affect the comparison we must make with their parallel scale. For example: E Phrygian is a minor mode, therefore it should be compared to E Natural Minor and not E Major. By doing so, we would find out that the two scales differ from each other by one note: F in the Phrygian mode instead of F# which appears on the E Natural Minor scale.

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